Thursday, September 30, 2010

Old Recipe For Poverty Cake


Yesterday I wrote about the old cookbook that I'll be using to see what kind of desserts they used to eat before the invention of the electric oven. I chose the recipe for poverty cake as my first victim because it looked pretty simple.

                                                              Poverty Cake
       Mix together half a cupful of molasses, half a cupful of sugar, one egg and two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. When these are beaten together thoroughly add one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in half a cupful of cold water, cinnamon or ginger to taste, and one and a half cupfuls of flour. Bake in a shallow pan in a moderate oven for about thirty minutes.
      Good, in spite of the name!

I followed the recipe and added 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, but I think that I could have added 1 tsp. I used an 8" round pan and baked at 350 degrees. The poverty cake was surprisingly good, I didn't think that it would rise as much as it did. It was definitely on the heavy side, but my kids both wanted to eat more and said that they liked it a lot. It tasted like a molasses-y gingerbread, and if you altered the spices it would be a very similar flavor to gingerbread, with a heavier texture.

So it wasn't so bad for something with that name. Give it a try and let me know what you think!

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 Kara Buntin owns A Cake To Remember LLC in Richmond VA, and cake supplies online at www.acaketoremember.com and www.acaketoremember.etsy.com

3 comments:

Valerie said...

Called it Depression cake in my house growing up........had to make it for my mom's birthday every blessed year, even though she's the only one who ate it:-) Used nutmeg, too, and lots of golden raisins for added moisture. Baked in a bundt or angel food pan.

Kara said...

That's funny that you recognize the recipe! Since the cookbook was published in 1903 the Depression hadn't happened yet, so I guess the name hadn't been "promoted" to commemorate the event yet.

Anonymous said...

it's called poor man's cake in my granny's old cookbook.
cindy/cindy's cakery